interesting

PsyBlog: The Attitude-Behaviour Gap: Why We Say One Thing But Do The Opposite

I try to remember this little tidbit below when speaking with most people. They will take their perceived stand but when faced with the situation they will probably bend. I include myself in this category.

that people don’t do what they say they will in many situations – has been backed up by countless later studies, although in more sophisticated fashion. The question is: why?

PsyBlog: The Attitude-Behaviour Gap: Why We Say One Thing But Do The Opposite

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Hand-Eye Coordination: Can You Improve It?

I started researching this topic to see if there is something, late in life, that you can do to improve this type of coordination. While I doubt I’ll get much better at Tennis, I’ll certainly give the eye focusing exercise a try.

Can you improve your “sports vision?” Are there exercises that can help your eyes? Because I treat so many professional and high-level athletes, I am often asked if vision can be improved as it relates to sports performance.

While I don’t think there are exercises that can improve your vision per se, you can improve the way your body tracks moving objects by doing some simple drills. This will help on the field and on the court.

Try playing catch with a friend. Use a large Wiffle Ball (or any larger ball). Write large letters and numbers on the ball with a Sharpie. Try to call out the last number or letter you see before catching the ball. Also practice quickly focusing on a near, then far object. Keep going back and forth – faster and faster, focusing on your ability to focus properly.

Hand-Eye Coordination: Can You Improve It? on Yahoo! Health

"Power Shift" – How to Boost Your Memory

If you see someone doing a Felix the Cat impression then they might be trying to remember something. According to this article below, moving your eyes left to right can help you remember. I’d be interested to know if anyone actually does this or has used to this trick to help them remember.

A recent study suggests that merely glancing from left to right (the traditional “shifty look” of spies and sneaks) can boost memory power and help people differentiate between real and imagined memories. Moving the eyes up and down had no such effect. The trick may work because the specific left/right eye movement engages both the left and right hemispheres of the brain at the same time. As little as 30 seconds of the activity could be enough to help you remember where you left your wallet, or the number sequence needed to deactivate that bomb.

“Power Shift” -How to Boost Your Memory | The Daily Galaxy: News from Planet Earth & Beyond

Tortoise-Pigeon-Dog – Advice from 256 year old man

It’s not certain whether Li Ching-Yun actually lived to be that old but his advice is useful: “Keep a quiet heart, sit like a tortoise, walk sprightly like a pigeon and sleep like a dog.”

Here is the excerpt from the Time magazine article from 1933:

In the province of Szechwan in China lived until last week Li Ching-yun. In China where Age means something he was a great man. By his own story he was born in 1736, had lived 197 years. By the time he was ten years old he had traveled in Kansu, Shansi, Tibet, Annam, Siam and Manchuria gathering herbs. He continued to gather herbs for the rest of his first 100 years. He lived on herbs and plenty of rice wine. When asked for his secret of long life. Li Ching-yun gave it readily: “Keep a quiet heart, sit like a tortoise, walk sprightly like a pigeon and sleep like a dog.” The “Scholar War Lord” Wu Pei-fu. not satisfied with this formula, took Li into his home and was lectured on “how to get the most out of each century” by maintaining “inward calm.” Some said he had buried 23 wives, was living with his 24th. a woman of 60, had descendants of eleven generations. The fingernails of his venerable right hand were six inches long. Yet to skeptical Western eyes he looked much like any Chinese 60-year-old. In 1930 Professor Wu Chung-chieh, dean of the department of education at Chengtu University, found records that the Imperial Chinese Government had congratulated one Li Ching-yun in 1827 on his birthday. The birthday was his 150th, making the man who died last week—if it was the same Li Ching-yun, and respectful Chinese preferred to think so—a 256-year-old.

Tortoise-Pigeon-Dog – TIME

This American Life – Great Radio Show

This is a great show with humor, heart and some insight. It’s great to listen to the different stories through my iPod. Here is a brief description of the show:

If you’ve never heard This American Life, our staff’s favorite shows page provides a great introduction to what we do. You might want to start there. After a few episodes, we’re sure you’ll figure it out. Or, if you’re looking for a written introduction, here goes:
One of our problems from the start has been that when we try to describe This American Life in a sentence or two, it just sounds awful. For instance: each week we choose a theme and put together different kinds of stories on that theme. That doesn’t sound like something we’d want to listen to on the radio, and it’s our show.
So usually we just say what we’re not. We’re not a news show or a talk show or a call-in show. We’re not really formatted like other radio shows at all.

This American Life – About Our Radio Show

Go Speed Reader

I’ll admit that I don’t read as often I would like to. It just seems like there is too much crap to watch on TV or YouTube. The last book I read was Freakonmics. Great book. Gets you thinking even if you don’t agree with it.

I’m a slow reader but this book took me two months to finish. However, I only really read it for about 20 minutes a day and the information is worth comprehending. But I’m still pretty slow to average reader.

So I was happy to discover this link to improve your reading speed with comprehension. The article was so interesting that I actually read it and not just file into my Del.icio.us links that I will probably never read.

Take a look at this interesting article on doubling your reading rate.

I’ll report back on if it works for me but don’t hold your breath. It will take me some time to master but I immediately liked what he said about the subvocalizing.

Btw, speaking of good books, this one looks good too:
Survival of the Sickest